EDI Benefits

Enhancing Existing Therapies

EDI is a technique for enhancing the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions through an approach that is engaging, accessible, and powerful. EDI integrates seamlessly into existing behavioral therapies, improving clinical outcomes by enabling expression of complex thoughts and experiences in ways often not possible through language.

Leading organizations find that EDI can be integrated with minimal disruption or training into proven therapies including:

  • Recovery Support
  • Journaling
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)
  • Motivational Interviewing (MI)
  • Sample EDI Application: Chronic Pain
  • Newly published EDI research strongly supports what participants and clinicians have reported in numerous EDI pilot studies. The EDI Institute is now moving forward with randomized trials to quantify actual impact of EDI on health outcomes.

    Recovery Support

    Recovery Support is an integral component of many behavioral therapy programs, supporting individuals after treatment to help prevent relapse. Our partners integrate EDI into existing Recovery Support programs by allowing participants to create image-based statements of recovery strategies, warning signs, and coping mechanisms.

    Today’s standard of care for Recovery Support typically involves text-based documents that individuals take home upon discharge. EDI allows the creation of image-based Recovery Support tools that clinicians and participants find more effective in providing support after treatment. Research is underway to assess and quantify the resulting improvement in long-term health outcomes.


    Journaling

    EDI is frequently used by participants to create visual journals portraying their recoveries from mental illness, addiction, trauma, and other life challenges. Patients and clinicians find that these journals enhance the therapeutic process, and the EDI Institute is performing scientific research to validate these outcomes.

    Participants often keep these images with them in the form of a photo book. The images serve as powerful reminders of their journey, and help them remember what keeps them on track in recovery. This sample book documents a journey from addiction to recovery. Turn device horizontal for best viewing.

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    CBT is one of the most established and effective treatments for mental health disorders. Participants and clinicians often report that EDI enhances the effectiveness of CBT by enabling expression of complex thoughts and experiences inaccessible through words.

    Below is an example of the use of EDI with CBT in the creation of a typical CBT Thought Diary. In this EDI version, images are used to express a personal situation, the unhealthy thoughts/feelings that can result, and alternative thoughts/feelings based on clinical intervention. This can be compared with a traditional text-based Thought Diary also depicted here.


    Text Thought Diary
    EDI Thought Diary

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an empirically-supported treatment that was originally developed to treat borderline personality disorder. It has since been found to be effective for the treatment of various mental health disorders, including substance use disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety, and eating disorders.

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy has four modules: Interpersonal Effectiveness, Distress Tolerance, Mindfulness, and Emotion Regulation. Participants in DBT programs are using EDI to create imagery to reinforce the skills that they have learned for each of these modules.

    Sarah DBT Skills

    Motivational Interviewing

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a goal-oriented counseling approach that focuses on facilitating a client’s intrinsic motivation and resolving ambivalence to motivate behavior change. Motivational Interviewing involves exploring the potential outcomes of changing versus not changing a behavior. While originally developed to treat alcohol addiction, MI is now used in a range of behavioral health treatments.

    The addition of EDI to MI can help a client to visualize the results of changing versus not changing a behavior. The following provides an example of a text-based versus EDI-based decision balance worksheet for stopping drinking behavior.

    Decision Balance Worksheet EDI

    Sample EDI Application: Chronic Pain

    EDI can be easily customized across multiple therapeutic settings, and has already been used successfully for individuals facing psychiatric illness, addiction, autism, trauma, cancer, and other chronic medical conditions. The EDI Institute collaborates closely with our partners to quickly and seamlessly integrate EDI into existing therapeutic programs.

    This sample application illustrates the use of EDI for chronic pain management, including therapeutic approaches such as Guided Imagery Visualization, Pain Journaling, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). In these examples, images and their associated captions take the place of written text, enhancing the effectiveness of each therapeutic technique.

    Enhancing Existing Therapies

    EDI is a technique for enhancing the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions through an approach that is engaging, accessible, and powerful. EDI integrates seamlessly into existing behavioral therapies, improving clinical outcomes by enabling expression of complex thoughts and experiences in ways often not possible through language.

    Leading organizations find that EDI can be integrated with minimal disruption or training into proven therapies including:

  • Recovery Support
  • Journaling
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)
  • Motivational Interviewing (MI)
  • Sample EDI Application: Chronic Pain
  • Newly published EDI research strongly supports what participants and clinicians have reported in numerous EDI pilot studies. The EDI Institute is now moving forward with randomized trials to quantify actual impact of EDI on health outcomes.

     

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    Recovery Support

    Recovery Support is an integral component of many behavioral therapy programs, supporting individuals after treatment to help prevent relapse. Our partners integrate EDI into existing Recovery Support programs by allowing participants to create image-based statements of recovery strategies, warning signs, and coping mechanisms.

    Today’s standard of care for Recovery Support typically involves text-based documents that individuals take home upon discharge. EDI allows the creation of image-based Recovery Support tools that clinicians and participants find more effective in providing support after treatment. Research is underway to assess and quantify the resulting improvement in long-term health outcomes.

    Journaling

    EDI is frequently used by participants to create visual journals portraying their recoveries from mental illness, addiction, trauma, and other life challenges. Patients and clinicians find that these journals enhance the therapeutic process, and the EDI Institute is performing scientific research to validate these outcomes.

    Participants often keep these images with them in the form of a photo book. The images serve as powerful reminders of their journey, and help them remember what keeps them on track in recovery. This sample book documents a journey from addiction to recovery.

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    CBT is one of the most established and effective treatments for mental health disorders. Participants and clinicians often report that EDI enhances the effectiveness of CBT by enabling expression of complex thoughts and experiences inaccessible through words.

    Below is an example of the use of EDI with CBT in the creation of a typical CBT Thought Diary. In this EDI version, images are used to express a personal situation, the unhealthy thoughts/feelings that can result, and alternative thoughts/feelings based on clinical intervention. This can be compared with a traditional text-based Thought Diary also depicted here.

    CBT Graphic

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an empirically-supported treatment that was originally developed to treat borderline personality disorder. It has since been found to be effective for the treatment of various mental health disorders, including substance use disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety, and eating disorders.

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy has four modules: Interpersonal Effectiveness, Distress Tolerance, Mindfulness, and Emotion Regulation. Participants in DBT programs are using EDI to create imagery to reinforce the skills that they have learned for each of these modules.

    Sarah DBT Skills

    Motivational Interviewing

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a goal-oriented counseling approach that focuses on facilitating a client’s intrinsic motivation and resolving ambivalence to motivate behavior change. Motivational Interviewing involves exploring the potential outcomes of changing versus not changing a behavior. While originally developed to treat alcohol addiction, MI is now used in a range of behavioral health treatments.

    The addition of EDI to MI can help a client to visualize the results of changing versus not changing a behavior. The following provides an example of an EDI-based decision balance worksheet for stopping unhealthy drinking behaviors.


    Decision Balance Worksheet EDI 

    Sample EDI Application: Chronic Pain

    EDI can be easily customized across multiple therapeutic settings, and has already been used successfully for individuals facing psychiatric illness, addiction, autism, trauma, cancer, and other chronic medical conditions. The EDI Institute collaborates closely with our partners to quickly and seamlessly integrate EDI into existing therapeutic programs.

    This sample application illustrates the use of EDI for chronic pain management, including therapeutic approaches such as Guided Imagery Visualization, Pain Journaling, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). In these examples, images and their associated captions take the place of written text, enhancing the effectiveness of each therapeutic technique.